The Gloucestershire's Alcove. Dud Corner Cemetery Loos. FR. NR25
The Gloucestershire's Alcove. Dud Corner Cemetery Loos. FR. NR25

The graves and memorials to the missing principally commemorate those who fell in the Battle of Loos in 1915. The total number, including those who fell in later actions, is 20,596. There are some 1800 graves of which only 684 are of identified men. The panels run round the walls by regiment. The panels in this alcove are principally men of the Gloucestershire Regiment.

One of the names on the Irish Guards section of the memorial wall used to be of Lt John ‘Jack’ Kipling, son of the Nobel Laureate writer, Rudyard Kipling. Kipling was particularly favourable of British intervention in The Great War and wrote patriotic propaganda material for the Government.

His son John was initially rejected by both The Royal Navy and The Army due to poor eyesight but his father used his considerable influence to overturn this decision. John joined The Irish Guards. During the Battle of Loos John Kipling was reported missing. His parents made great efforts to find him, searching in field hospitals and interviewing comrades, but with no success. His name was one of those commemorated as missing, with no known grave, on a Dud Corner panel.

However, research in the 1990’s and 2000’s has resulted in the grave of a 2nd Lt Irish Guards buried in St Mary's ADS Cemetery at Haisnes to be that of John Kipling.

Rudyard Kipling was devastated at the loss of his only son and became bitterly remorseful. He wrote the lines, “If any question why we died, it is because our fathers lied.” Kipling wrote the inscription seen on the grave of every unknown soldier, “Known Unto God”, the inscription, "The Glorious Dead" on the Cenotaph in London and the inscription on every Stone of Remembrance in CWGC cemeteries, “Their Name Liveth For Evermore”

The Gloucestershire's Alcove. Dud Corner Cemetery Loos. FR. NR25

The graves and memorials to the missing principally commemorate those who fell in the Battle of Loos in 1915. The total number, including those who fell in later actions, is 20,596. There are some 1800 graves of which only 684 are of identified men. The panels run round the walls by regiment. The panels in this alcove are principally men of the Gloucestershire Regiment.

One of the names on the Irish Guards section of the memorial wall used to be of Lt John ‘Jack’ Kipling, son of the Nobel Laureate writer, Rudyard Kipling. Kipling was particularly favourable of British intervention in The Great War and wrote patriotic propaganda material for the Government.

His son John was initially rejected by both The Royal Navy and The Army due to poor eyesight but his father used his considerable influence to overturn this decision. John joined The Irish Guards. During the Battle of Loos John Kipling was reported missing. His parents made great efforts to find him, searching in field hospitals and interviewing comrades, but with no success. His name was one of those commemorated as missing, with no known grave, on a Dud Corner panel.

However, research in the 1990’s and 2000’s has resulted in the grave of a 2nd Lt Irish Guards buried in St Mary's ADS Cemetery at Haisnes to be that of John Kipling.

Rudyard Kipling was devastated at the loss of his only son and became bitterly remorseful. He wrote the lines, “If any question why we died, it is because our fathers lied.” Kipling wrote the inscription seen on the grave of every unknown soldier, “Known Unto God”, the inscription, "The Glorious Dead" on the Cenotaph in London and the inscription on every Stone of Remembrance in CWGC cemeteries, “Their Name Liveth For Evermore”