Tyne Cot Cemetery. Ypres. BE. NR30
Tyne Cot Cemetery. Ypres. BE. NR30

Tyne Cot Cemetery, east of the N303 between the villages of Zonnebeke and Passchendale, some 6 miles NE of Ypres, is the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in the world.

Over 11,900 soldiers of WW1 lie buried here. 34,000 names of those with no known grave are also commemorated here, the panels of the Menin Gate Memorial to The Missing having been filled.

The origin of the name Tyne Cot is not clear. It is said that a barn on the site was given that name by The Northumberland Fusiliers, who served in this part of the line in May 1915.

Whatever the origins of the name, Tyne Cot and the surrounding five or six German blockhouses were captured by the 3rd Australian Division on 4 October 1917, in the advance on Passchendaele.

One of these pillboxes was unusually large and was used as an advanced dressing station after its capture. From 6 October to the end of March 1918, 343 graves were made, on two sides of it, by the 50th (Northumbrian) and 33rd Divisions, and by two Canadian units.

The name Tyne Cot became associated with the cemetery at this time. Tyne Cot was in German hands again from 13 April to 28 September 1918, when it was finally recaptured, with Passchendaele, by the Belgian Army.

Tyne Cot Cemetery. Ypres. BE. NR30

Tyne Cot Cemetery, east of the N303 between the villages of Zonnebeke and Passchendale, some 6 miles NE of Ypres, is the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in the world.

Over 11,900 soldiers of WW1 lie buried here. 34,000 names of those with no known grave are also commemorated here, the panels of the Menin Gate Memorial to The Missing having been filled.

The origin of the name Tyne Cot is not clear. It is said that a barn on the site was given that name by The Northumberland Fusiliers, who served in this part of the line in May 1915.

Whatever the origins of the name, Tyne Cot and the surrounding five or six German blockhouses were captured by the 3rd Australian Division on 4 October 1917, in the advance on Passchendaele.

One of these pillboxes was unusually large and was used as an advanced dressing station after its capture. From 6 October to the end of March 1918, 343 graves were made, on two sides of it, by the 50th (Northumbrian) and 33rd Divisions, and by two Canadian units.

The name Tyne Cot became associated with the cemetery at this time. Tyne Cot was in German hands again from 13 April to 28 September 1918, when it was finally recaptured, with Passchendaele, by the Belgian Army.