The Stone of Remembrance. 11/11/2008. 90th Anniversary of The Armistice. Mons. BE
The Stone of Remembrance. 11/11/2008. 90th Anniversary of The Armistice. Mons. BE

The Stone of Remembrance memorial is to be found in all Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries containing 1000 or more graves or at sites commemorating 1000 or more dead. The one in the photograph is in the cemetery at Mons, Belgium.

Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens to commemorate the dead of WW1 it has since been used to commemorate Commonwealth dead of WW2.

The design is intended to commemorate “those of all faiths and none”. Lutyens’s design was “based on studies of The Parthenon”. Lutyens specified a stone 12 feet in length standing on a plinth of three steps. He further specified no “undue ornament and tricky and elaborate carvings”. The design includes subtle curves so that the stone does not have any straight lines. The curves, if extended, would form a sphere 1801’ 8”/549.15m in diameter.

The inscription, proposed by Rudyard Kipling, comes from The Book of Ecclesiasticus, in the Old Testament of The Bible.

“Their Name Liveth For Evermore”

The Stone of Remembrance. 11/11/2008. 90th Anniversary of The Armistice. Mons. BE

The Stone of Remembrance memorial is to be found in all Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries containing 1000 or more graves or at sites commemorating 1000 or more dead. The one in the photograph is in the cemetery at Mons, Belgium.

Designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens to commemorate the dead of WW1 it has since been used to commemorate Commonwealth dead of WW2.

The design is intended to commemorate “those of all faiths and none”. Lutyens’s design was “based on studies of The Parthenon”. Lutyens specified a stone 12 feet in length standing on a plinth of three steps. He further specified no “undue ornament and tricky and elaborate carvings”. The design includes subtle curves so that the stone does not have any straight lines. The curves, if extended, would form a sphere 1801’ 8”/549.15m in diameter.

The inscription, proposed by Rudyard Kipling, comes from The Book of Ecclesiasticus, in the Old Testament of The Bible.

“Their Name Liveth For Evermore”